Monday, August 14, 2017

BRIDGING GAPS AROUND THE WORLD

BY JANET STEINBERG



"I want to be the bridge to the next generation”
Michael Jordan

BRIDGE?  What is a bridge?  

A bridge can be different things to different people.  It can be a ship's control room…an understanding between people…the closing of a generation gap…a means of approach…the top of a nose…or even a partial plate of false teeth.  However, the bridges that fascinate me the most are those structures that allow passage across an obstacle. We walk on some, we drive on some, we sail under some and we even shop on some.  

In some respects, bridges are like people.  They have personalities and even nicknames such as The Swinging Queen, The Comb and The Coathanger. They personify the imagination, the architecture and the art of a city.  Next time you approach a bridge, don’t just walk on it or drive across it.   Be sure to look at it…I mean really look at it!  When I finally took a good look at a bridge that had been in my Cincinnati hometown for decades before I was born, I realized there was a treasure approximately one mile from my home.  Please allow me to share with you my hometown treasure and some other architectural gems from around the world.

Monday, July 31, 2017

CALISTOGA, CALIFORNIA: HOT SPRINGS, COOL WINES AND MUD BATHS

BY JANET STEINBERG

In California’s Napa Valley, Calistoga was the vision of Sam Brannan who purchased property, including the "Spring Grounds", in the early 1860s. Impressed by the New York resort of Saratoga, he decided to make his development the "Saratoga of California."  After too much champagne, Brannan slurred "we'll make this the Calistoga of Sarifornia".  Realizing his mistake, he then proclaimed, "So be it!  We'll just name it Calistoga".         

         
Dr. Wilkinson's Hot Springs Resort is synonymous with the word Calistoga.  One of Calistoga's oldest spas, Dr. Wilkinson’s has been serving guests for approximately 65 years.  When I first visited this iconic wine country resort around the turn of the century, the late Doc Wilkinson was in his eighties and still greeting his guests. The then-octogenarian “King of Mud”, told me that “the mud baths will always be the main attraction here .”   Since Dr. Wilkinson’s death, his children Carolynne and Mark have carried on their father’s tradition and history. The original 1952 neon sign still glows and legacy abounds.  They have kept a certain formula while keeping up with the times...constantly upgrading the lodging and amenities. There is even a TESLA charging station on property.

THE ORIGINAL1952  NEON SIGN 

Monday, July 17, 2017

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY: SIX IN THE CITY

BY JANET STEINBERG

Part 4 of a Series

Whether it’s wood, stone or metal…whether it’s carved or cast…whether it’s a monumental work of art  or a preliminary miniature maquette…I simply adore sculpture.  Wherever I travel I search the globe for sensational sculpture, be it a world capital or the 4th smallest capital city in the United States. This time it is the latter…six sculptures in Kentucky’s tiny capital city of Frankfort. 

1. NEXUS, and its sister sculpture, 'Now Get', sits in front of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Building at the convergence of Holmes, High, and Mero Streets. Sculptors Erika Streker and Tony Higdon describe the 50-foot tall Nexus as an amalgamation of themes relating to transportation, including a bridge form, the wing of an airplane, and a boat form. The sculptors, who created the sculpture horizontally and then installed it vertically, explained that the title of the piece means a convergence or coming together.


NEXUS

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

BOURBON, BROWNS & MORE: 100-PROOF PURE PLEASURE


BY JANET STEINBERG 

Part 3 of a Series

Hot Browns and Po-Boys…fried green tomatoes and bourbon pie!  

The dining scene in small-town Frankfort, Kentucky (the 4th smallest capital city in the US) is down-home, yet down right delicious. On a recent visit, I did not find sophisticated restaurants with Michelin stars, starched linen tablecloths, and white-gloved waiters.  However, what I did find were fun diners, locally owned bistros, and Mom & Pop restaurants, with food that would please even the most sophisticated palate.  My first dinner in Frankfort had to be that of the traditional Kentucky favorite, the Hot Brown. 

HOT BROWN is not a fashion statementnot a trendy color to wear to an autumn dinner party. Hot Brown is dinner!  It is a culinary concoction dating back to the 1920’s when it was created at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky.  The Hot Brown has survived for almost a century and has since become a ‘Kentucky Thing’.

GIBBY’S HOT BROWN

Monday, June 19, 2017

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY: FRANKFORT DISTILLED

BY JANET STEINBERG 

                                                                        
           Part 2 of a Series


                     Some measure time by stars 
        And some by hours;
                          Some measure days by dreams,
           And some by flowers.
                                                                        - Madison Cawein, Kentucky Poet  


Once you have walked hand-in-hand with history in the streets of old town Frankfort, it’s time to turn your attention to some special attractions…ones you might have seen in passing, or read about in brochures, but didn’t take the time to really absorb and enjoy. 
Let begin with the hand Mother Nature plays in Frankfort.  Not to be upstaged by the Capital City’s political status, Mother Nature takes center stage with her undulating Kentucky River that winds its way around the base of the city, and with her scenic Bluegrass Country hills that surround it.  Her seasonal flowers blanket the Capitol grounds, grace the specialty gardens of government buildings, and form the face of a renowned clock.

KENTUCKY RIVER WINDS AROUND THE BASE OF THE CITY