Monday, May 18, 2015

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA: CAROLINA DREAMIN’


BY JANET STEINBERG

PART THREE OF A SERIES

Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina in the morning….and especially on a morning when you are arriving into Charleston’s bustling harbor on the fourth day of a glorious Silversea cruise.  Our cruise, on Silversea’s Silver Shadow, had just sailed us 80 nautical miles along the Atlantic Coast of the South’s fabled Low Country…from Savannah, Georgia to Charleston, South Carolina.  

SILVER SHADOW DOCKED IN CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

Monday, May 4, 2015

SAVANNAH: A REAL GEORGIA PEACH


BY JANET STEINBERG 
PART TWO OF A SERIES

Spanish moss dripping from live oaks…stately mansions exuding the charm of the 1800’s…historic Revolutionary and Civil war sites.   This is Savannah, Georgia. Classic yet cool, historic yet hip, this “Hostess City of the South” magically melds the old with the new.


SPANISH MOSS DRIPPING FROM LIVE OAKS

Monday, April 20, 2015

SILVER SHADOW: AN ATLANTIC COASTAL ADVENTURE


BY JANET STEINBERG

La vie est belle.  Life is beautiful…on the high seas.
Many years ago, an ocean liner’s slogan was “Getting there is half the fun”.  As a dyed-in-the-wool cruiseaholic, I am compelled to bring that slogan up to date for the 21st century.  My version has to be: “How you get there is more than half the fun”. My recent cruise aboard Silversea’s Silver Shadow was living proof of that.


GETTING THERE ON SILVER SHADOW IS MORE THAN HALF THE FUN

Monday, April 6, 2015

DUBLIN: TREASURE IRELAND



BY JANET STEINBERG

“In Dublin’s fair city, where the girls are so pretty,

I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone…” 

Just as the tragic ballad laments, there she stood greeting me at the top of Grafton Street.  In all her buxom bronze splendor, the 18th-century fish-monger is still drawing a crowd to her wheel-barrow laden with cockles and mussels.  Immortalized in 1988 by sculptor Jean Rynhart, Molly Malone has been affectionately, yet irreverently, dubbed by irrepressible Dubliners as “The Tart with the Cart”.

MOLLY MALONE

Monday, March 23, 2015

BUDAPEST: A HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY



BY JANET STEINBERG

“I would not eat the soup of life with a fork; I would continue to use a big ladle.”
                                                     George Lang, Holocaust Survivor/Restaurateur 

TIME: 11 PM.  PLACE: The Danube River.  COUNTRY: Hungary.
As we glided down the Danube on our approach to Budapest, all passengers rushed to the upper deck of  the river boat that had been our floating hotel for the past week.  The cruise staff had forewarned us not to miss the sight of this city that would be our on-shore home for the last three days of our Danube River tour.

As we approached the final stretch, a breathtaking sight appeared before our eyes.  The city of Budapest, gracing both sides of the Danube River, was ablaze with thousands of lights.  Lights outlining the regal bridges; lights outlining the Neoclassical buildings; lights outlining the grand monuments.  Budapest (pronounced Budapesht) was a veritable fairyland.  A fantasy that Walt Disney might have conjured up.

With morning came reality.  Here we were, one-fourth of the way around the world, in an exotic, mysterious city that had been devastated in WWII and inaccessibly cloistered behind an Iron Curtain in the last half of the 20th century.  Here we were, watching history being made in a city that was, once again, being rebuilt and reinvented by its proud people.

The city we know as Budapest was once three cities existing side by side.  Obuda, with Celtic and Roman ruins, is the oldest section; Buda is the home of Castle Hill and the finest residential areas; and Pest is the seat of the bustling government and commercial areas.  

PEST FROM THE BUDA SIDE